Meet the Laureates
Meet the Laureates

Jody Williams – USA, 1997

Jody Williams received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997 for her work to ban landmines through the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, which shared the Peace Prize with her that year. At that time, she became the 10th woman - and third American woman - in its almost 100-year history to receive the Prize.  Since her protests of the Vietnam War, she has been a life-long advocate of freedom, self-determination and human and civil rights.

Like others who have seen the ravages of war, she is an outspoken peace activist who struggles to reclaim the real meaning of peace - a concept which goes far beyond the absence of armed conflict and is defined by human security, not national security. Williams believes that working for peace is not for the faint of heart.  It requires dogged persistence and a commitment to sustainable peace, built on environmental justice and meeting the basic needs of the majority of people on our planet.


Since January of 2006, Jody Williams has worked toward those ends through the Nobel Women's Initiative, which she chairs.  Along with sister Nobel Laureate Dr. Shirin Ebadi of Iran, she took the lead in establishing the Nobel Women’s Initiative.  They were joined at that time by sister Nobel Laureates Wangari Maathai (Kenya), Rigoberta Menchú Tum (Guatemala) and Betty Williams and Mairead Maguire (Northern Ireland). The Initiative uses the prestige of the Nobel Peace Prize and the influence and access of the women Nobel Laureates themselves to support and amplify the efforts of women around the world working for sustainable peace with justice and equality.

Since 1998, Williams has also served as a Campaign Ambassador for the International Campaign to Ban Landmines.  Beginning in early 1992 with two non-governmental organizations and a staff of one - Jody Williams, she oversaw the Campaign's growth to over 1,300 organizations in 95 countries working to eliminate antipersonnel landmines. In an unprecedented cooperative effort with governments, UN bodies and the International Committee of the Red Cross, she served as a chief strategist and spokesperson for the ICBL as it dramatically achieved its goal of an international treaty banning antipersonnel landmines during a diplomatic conference held in Oslo in September 1997.

Williams continues to be recognized for her contributions to human rights and global security. She is the recipient of fifteen honorary degrees, among other recognitions. In 2004, Williams was named by Forbes Magazine as one of the 100 most powerful women in the world in the publication of its first such annual list.
 
She holds the Sam and Cele Keeper Endowed Professorship in Peace and Social Justice at the Graduate College of Social Work at the University of Houston where she has been teaching since 2003.  In academic year 2012-2013, she became the inaugural Jane Addams Distinguished Visiting Fellow in Social Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago.


Her new memoir on life as a grassroots activist, My Name is Jody Williams:  A Vermont Girl’s Winding Path to the Nobel Peace Prize was released by the University of California Press in early 2013.

Nobel Peace Prize

International Campaign to Ban Landmines

Jody's ICBL Page

Books

My Name is Jody Williams: A Vermont Girl's Winding Path to the Nobel Peace Prize (2013)

Banning Landmines: Disarmament, Citizen Diplomacy, and Human Security (2008 with Stephen Goose and Mary Wareham)

Statements & Media

Click here to see the latest media and statements from Jody Williams.

Featuring

jody video aljazeera thumbnail

Video: Jody speaks to Al Jazeera about what has inspired her activism.

Quotes

What you do to make the world a better place is all that counts.

Demilitarization isn’t a dirty word; nonviolence isn’t non-action; and real peace isn’t for wimps.

Anybody can change the world…Often I am introduced as an example of an individual who changed the world…. I’m an ordinary gal from teeny tiny Vermont, who happens to believe not just in human rights but human responsibility. I believe that I have a responsibility to make this world a better place, and I believe anybody can do it.

Peace is not just the absence of war. It’s a world with justice and equality. It’s a world where the basic needs of the majority of the people on our planet are met. If we stop spending money on war and the weapons of war, we’d have more than enough to invest in these basics of long-term peace. People should have basic housing, access to medical care, education, and work. Everyone should have clean drinking water and food to eat every day.

Emotion without action is irrelevent.

No one anywhere in the (U.S.) government is standing up and asking “are we threatening world peace?”

The rest of the time is up to the rest of us.